Archive for the ‘Herb and Flower Tea’ Category

Autumn, a cold season, I guess many will agree with this.

Luckily, we don’t have to settle with it, there is a special tea that can help us prevent the cold, or if you have already caught one, it will help you relieve the syndrome and possibly recover sooner. The best of it: it’s so incredibly easy to make, and I bet you have already all the ingredients in your closet!

Ginger Black Tea

Ingredients:

– 1 black tea bag (any flavour you like, we use the ordinary princess tea)

– 1 tea spoon of ground ginger

– some honey or brown sugar

– some lemon

Cooking:

1. Make ground ginger ready, put them into your tea cup

2. Add black tea bag, pull in boiled water.

3. add in some lemon juice and honey/brown sugar with the amount you prefer.

Remember to drink it all, including the ginger!

You will be surprised to notice that how the cold syndrome relieved after only one cup of ginger black tea, at least that’s what happen to me! Not to say that this tea is actually very tasty!

Drinking ginger black tea as a health promoting/cold fighting method has been promoted by a well-known Japanese doctor 石原結實. According to him, you can drink 3-6 cups of ginger black tea everyday.

p.s In the Japanese doctor 石原結實’s book, he uses brown sugar instead of honey because brown sugar can warm up the body, by raising up the body temperature it will help to fight off diseases or discomfort. I myself use honey simply out of personal habit with tea. I do like brown sugar and use it in various herbal tea too.  

Just not long ago I noticed that some readers have questions about the proportion of ingredients from my previous post on Red Date and Longan tea, sorry that I haven’t got time to write anything on this site so I didn’t answer the questions yet, sorry for that!

I have to admit that since my son was born I have been often of “forgetting everything else but him”, and been spending all day/evening long with him, thus making very little progress (almost nothing at all?) on our Tea Emperor site.

But, better later than never! Here are some ingredients I have often used for this tea. Actually, comparing to this post I skipped one of the ingredients from  for a reason I will explain in the end of this article, also for the day of photo taking I happened to use brown sugar instead of Longan. (in Traditional Chinese Medicine it is said that brown sugar can “warm your body up”, and it is especially good to add them during menstruation days for women) therefore the ingredients in the photo are not exactly, 100% the same as the previous post, though very similar. But as the herb tea goes, you can always freely add what you like and skip those you happen to have not.

In the photo there are three ingredients: Red Date (left), Longan (top), and brown sugar (right)  You could of course replace brown sugar with Longan as shown in the post. If you add both of them (brown sugar and Longan), the taste of tea will be quite sweet and nice, of course you can always lesson the amount.

The propotion is very simple: starting with equal amount of all of them (as shown in the picture on top), then try to adjust accordingly to your preference. There is no absolute standard or “correct” way of doing it.

So, the ingredient that has been intentionally “missing” here, is Astragali radix (HuangQi in Chinese, written as 黃耆). This herb is very good for the health, but personally I can not use them at the moment because it is NOT GOOD for a person who have myoma in the uterus to eat HuangQi (yes, another important wisdom from Traditional Chinese Medicine, and we should get to more of those later)

One could say that we have a tea collection, but to say so would be incorrect. We merely buy more loose tea than what we consume. Poor is the faith of some of our purchases as tempting tea packages lay in some forgotten cupboard corner only to be tossed to the trash.

MAINLY LOOSE TEA

As you can see from the photo below there are mainly loose teas in our collection, but we have made some room for daily quick fixes and few specialties. With quick fix I refer to the morning bulk bag tea, which is fast, black, cheap and easy. Come to think of it that is almost how I like my women, but don’t tell that to the Empress…

Our collection of loose teas.

FEW SPECIALTIES

These we get from our travels to Asia and Northern Europe. Let’s face it, in Asia they know how to make a good cup of tea and in Northern Europe they have pristine nature with all sorts of wild plants just dying to be dried and labeled as X tea. So you want an example? Birch leaf tea, Bilberry leaf tea, Bilberry berry tea, Buckthorn tea, Cloudberry tea and then there are all those meadow herbs… I’d like to see them grow those in the Orient.

THE TEA COLLECTION

The good thing about having more than one tea brand in your slate is that you can offer more variety for the visitors, and more importantly, you can add some taste into your life just the way you need it. For some people tea collection might be a source for little competitive spirit. There’s nothing wrong in real tea collections, but remember that very few teas age well.

It is hard to tell, which is more correct blooming tea or blossoming tea. I will call this tea as blooming tea. Chinese are pretty clever people what comes to marketing. Their long culture is full of fables that are still present in today’s modern world. When you think of it, it is perfectly normal because people have not changed. Anyway, blooming tea borrows from the most natural celebration of life – blooming flowers.

WHAT IS BLOOMING TEA? This tea is hand-tied into the form of a sphere and it really quite looks like a flower bud. On the outer layer it has long tea leaves and inside the sphere hides a real flower. Leaves are tied together from the bottom to form the stem of the bud. When you add water to the vessel that holds a blooming tea bud it will float in the beginning. Soon the water seeps in to the bud and it starts to descend to the bottom. Water opens the bud and the tea blooms magnificently. The process takes less than a minute, but all that time one is mesmerized with the display. This tea is fantastic dessert surprise for formal and informal parties.

THE TASTE OF THE BLOOMING TEA Like it is with every tea and coffee, different brands and varieties do have different tastes. It is the same with blooming tea, but one thing holds true. Blooming tea will remain in your tea cup or tea glass (I strongly recommend a tall glass to get the best out of the experience) until consumed so the tea that is used in binding can’t be too strong, otherwise the taste of the ready blooming tea would be too bitter. Naturally the result is that blooming tea doesn’t handle well with repeated infusions.

Ricola instant tea drink – Good Night Tea – is today’s topic. In my previous review, I stopped before I really started the reviewing. The reason for that was the sugar heavy make of the instant tea drink. Good Night Tea from Ricola is even sweeter as the sugar content is close to 98% and infused herbs are mellow and don’t give much kick to the taste.

The more I drink this stuff the more I feel that these drinks should be called just instant drinks. It is almost like a box of cookies that plaster (WITH HUGE FONT) 100% chocolate inside and when you read the contents information you notice that there is less than 10% of chocolate out of total weight of the cookie… so much for the 100% chocolate. Well, I shall not mention Ricola’s products here again but as a warning example. I’d label this stuff together with sodas and the likes.

Ricola used to be my favourite big brand name manufacturer of foodstuffs. The company was established in 1924 and originally made various sugary sweets of which a cough drop with herbs became a big hit and was further developed into a Swiss Herbal Candy. Customers took the herbal candy and used it in the most peculiar manner. When candies were mixed into hot water the result was delicious herbal tea. Sales rocketed!

Eventually one thing led to another and the company became involved with supporting the growing herbs that they use in their production. Think of those pure plants high on the mountains, could there be a cleaner place to grow crops?

THE TEA REVIEW Enough of the company background and to the point. This time I’m going to focus on Ricola Herb Tea that is absolutely fantastic! With fantastic I refer to the taste, which is just delicious. Quick glance to the product information sheds some light on the reason for the taste. It must be delicious, because the herbal tea is basically sugar and only 2,7% of the content consists of herbs. Candy for kids, eh?

I don’t have scientific reports to back me up, but I believe that product, which has so much terrible carbon hydrates can’t compensate with a small amount of herbs. I know it tastes great, but for diabetes sake, don’t drink it! End of story. Drink real herbal tea instead!

According to Chinese ancient wisdom, one of the best drinks during the wintertime is Ginger Tea. Ginger has always played the role of warding off colds and flu in Chinese herbal medicine system, because colds and flu are considered as “coldness” from outside, while ginger can enhance the “warmness” from within.

In fact, it doesn’t take a Chinese medicine practitioner to know the benefits of ginger to human body, because the daily experience has long taught us that ginger always helps when we get cold, and it FEELS good to have many cups of ginger tea during freezing days.

Besides, a Japanese respected doctor and best-seller book author also recommends people to drink ginger black tea for the same reason: it keeps your body warm as well as keeping your whole immune system stronger.

Despite being called as Ginger Tea in Chinese (Jiang Cha), there is not always “tea” in itself. In fact, the most common way of making Ginger Tea, is to peer some ginger roots and slice them into thin slices, add them and some brown sugar into boiling water, wait for 10 minutes then it’s ready. If you prefer, you could also add some real tea leaves such as black tea or green tea, but most of the time Chinese drink it without “tea leaves”.

In next post, we will explain you step-by-step, how to make ginger tea.

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